You Can Live Without Producing Trash

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Woman Drastically Reduces Her Waste on a Journey to Zero Waste Living

Meera is a super fun, inspiring, and down-to-earth teacher & mom who's trying to reduce her waste as much as possible. She is documenting her journey in an Instagram blog here: https://www.instagram.com/thegreenmum/ We spent the day with Meera so she could show us all of the changes she's made so far. While she's not completely zero waste, she's dedicated to keeping her waste as low as possible over the long term. To start, she carries a zero waste kit with her every day, that includes a reusable water bottle, coffee cup, stainless steel straw and cutlery, cloth napkin, cloth bag, and produce bag. This helps her reduce an enormous amount of single-use plastics and food containers. When shopping for groceries, she goes to three stores: Bulk Barn for bulk goods, regular grocery stores or farmer's markets for produce, and Whole Foods or a bakery for bread. Meera's family has switched to using cloth instead of paper towels, reusable wipes, and cloth diapers. The last being one of the most effective ways she's been able to reduce her waste as a mom. Another thing she's done that we appreciate is doing research to find out exactly what is recyclable and compostable in her area so that any waste the family creates is properly disposed of. The initiatives, inspiration, and information that Meera mentions in the video are linked below: The Terra Cycle box that helps recycle typically non-recyclable waste: https://www.terracycle.ca/en-CA The Plastic Oceans movie (super informative and inspiring): https://plasticoceans.org/ Bulk Barn reusable container program: http://www.bulkbarn.ca/Reusable-Container-Program/Program-Steps.html "In a business-as-usual scenario, the ocean is expected to contain 1 tonne of plastic for every 3 tonnes of fish by 2025, and by 2050, more plastics than fish (by weight)." World Economic Forum report: The New Plastics Economy (page 7) http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_The_New_Plastics_Economy.pdf We hope you find this video inspiring enough to make some waste-reduction changes in your lifestyle, too! Thanks for watching! Mat & Danielle ------------------------------------------------------------- STAY IN TOUCH! ------------------------------------------------------------- Blog: www.exploringalternatives.ca Facebook: /exploringalternativesblog Instagram: @exploringalternatives ------------------------------------------------------------- SUBTITLES AND CLOSED CAPTIONS ------------------------------------------------------------- A very special thank you to our subtitle and closed captions contributors! If you would like to contribute subtitles or closed captions to an Exploring Alternatives video, please click here to see which ones need your help: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC8EQAfueDGNeqb1ALm0LjHA&tab=2 To learn how to create and submit subtitles and closed captions, check out this YouTube info page: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623 If you would like credit for your subtitles, translation, or closed captions in the description of the video, please email us with your full name, the language of your translation, and the video title that you worked on. You can email us at: danielle.is.exploring@gmail.com ------------------------------------------------------------- SPONSORS ------------------------------------------------------------- We occasionally include paid sponsor messages/integrations in our videos to help fund the channel. We do our best to work with companies and organizations that offer products or services that are in line with our values, and that we think would be interesting and useful to our viewers. We will always disclose if we’re promoting products that were given to us for free, or if we’re including a sponsored message in our video. For business or sponsorship inquiries, please email us at danielle.is.exploring@gmail.com ------------------------------------------------------------- VIDEO CREDITS ------------------------------------------------------------- Music & Song Credits: All music in this video was composed, performed, and recorded by Mat of Exploring Alternatives. Editing Credits: Mat and Danielle of Exploring Alternatives Filming Credits: Mat of Exploring Alternatives

Life without plastic | DW Documentary

A Bavarian family has decided to do without plastic, to protect themselves from the toxins it contains. But plastic is an integral part of daily life nowadays. Will they be able to avoid it completely? _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories

A Snowboarder's Unbelievable Tiny House

Check out Mike's mobile Tiny Home: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbEupay_Ix8 Watch More Seeker Stories! Living in the Hidden Tunnels of Las Vegas: http://skr.cm/LVtunnels Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/c/seekerstories?sub_confirmation=1 Pro-snowboarder, Mike Basich, tours his self-built 225 square foot home in the middle of his 40 acre snow covered property near Truckee, CA - and shows how being close to nature drives his most creative decisions. In Going Off Grid, Laura Ling examines how 180,000 Americans a year are choosing to live entirely disconnected from our modern internet-focused world in pursuit of a more sustainable, simple lifestyle. Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/c/seekerstories?sub_confirmation=1 Join the Seeker community! Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/100537624873180533713/about Executive Producer: Laura Ling Producer: Paige Keipper (Hansen) Cinematographers: Matthew Piniol, Spencer Snider Editor: Lee Mould

How This Town Produces No Trash

Watch the next episode about Lauren Singer, who produced only a jar's worth of trash in 2 years: http://bit.ly/1QsnSqu Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/c/seekerstories?sub_confirmation=1 In 2003, the local government in Kamikatsu, Japan decided to require that all residents comply with a new, rigorous recycling program - perhaps the most rigorous in the world. Since then, the town composts, recycles, or reuses 80% of its garbage. It may not technically be 100% zero waste, as the remaining 20% goes into the landfill, but it's a remarkable achievement for an entire community, in such a short amount of time. The impacts have been positive - cutting costs for the community drastically, as well as improving the conditions of the lush and beautiful environment that surrounds the town in Southeast Japan. Residents must wash and sort virtually anything that is non-compostable in their household before bringing it to the recycling sorting center. Shampoo bottles, caps, cans, razors, styrofoam meat trays, water bottles...the list goes on and on (literally) into 34 categories. At the sorting center, labels on each bin indicate the recycling process for that specific item - how it will be recycled, what it will become, and how much that process can cost (or even earn). It's an education process for the consumer. All kitchen scraps must be composted at home, as the town has no garbage trucks or collectors. And as for other items, reuse is heavily encouraged. According to Akira Sakano, Deputy Chief Officer at Zero Waste Academy in Kamikatsu, the town has a kuru-kuru shop where residents can bring in used items and take things home for free. There is also a kuru-kuru factory, where local women make bags and clothes out of discarded items. At first, it was difficult to be come accustomed to the new rules. "It can be a pain, and at first we were opposed to the idea," says resident, Hatsue Katayama. "If you get used to it, it becomes normal." Now, it's even being noticed within Kamikatsu's businesses. The first zero-waste brewery has opened in Kamikatsu, called Rise and Win Brewery. The brewery itself is constructed of reused materials and environmentally friendly finishes. By 2020, Kamikatsu hopes to be 100% zero waste, with no use of landfills, and to forge connections with other like-minded communities in the world, spreading the practice of zero-waste. Join the Seeker community! Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com App - iOS http://seekernetwork.com/ios App - Android http://seekernetwork.com/android Executive Producer: Laura Ling Producer: Paige Keipper (Hansen) Cinematographer: Irene Carolina Herrera Editor: Lee Mould

The American Town Banning Cell Phones and Wi-Fi

Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/c/seekerstories?sub_confirmation=1 Watch more Seeker Stories http://bit.ly/1Ir9ebk Green Bank, West Virginia hosts the world's largest radio telescope to search for aliens. It's also a sanctuary for people who believe electromagnetic fields are harmful. Join the Seeker community! Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com App — iOS http://seekernetwork.com/ios App — Android http://seekernetwork.com/android Executive Producer: Laura Ling Producer: Paige Keipper (Hansen) Cinematographer: Matthew Piniol, Spencer Snider Editor: Jordan Dertinger

One New York woman is making an effort to change the way we think about waste. Over the past two years, Lauren Singer has produced only enough trash to fill a 16 oz mason jar.

In Going Off Grid, Laura Ling examines how 180,000 Americans a year are choosing to live entirely disconnected from our modern internet-focused world in pursuit of a more sustainable, simple lifestyle.

Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/c/seekerstories?sub_confirmation=1

Join the Seeker community!
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl
Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork
Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com
Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/100537624873180533713/about

Take the #ZeroWaste Challenge with us Tuesday, April 14th to go one day without producing trash. Tweet us @seekernetwork with #ZeroWaste and we'll donate $1 to Keep America Beautiful.
More details here: http://skr.cm/ZWchall

Executive Producer: Laura Ling
Producer: Paige Keipper (Hansen)
Cinematographers: Matthew Piniol, Spencer Snider
Editor: Lee Mould

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