Inside the Milky Way

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[Live Stream] · The Universe · How the Universe Works - National Geographic Documentary

[Live Stream] · The Universe · (24/7 NON-STOP Livestream!) Watch how the universe is made, how it all began and why our world and our universe looks as it is today. Explore new areas and learn science with us! - Rules No hate towards anyone in the chat No excessive / sexual roleplaying No racism No sexism No spamming No self-promotion No excessive use of caps Try not to instigate arguments - If the stream ever goes down, it will come back in less than a few seconds, with a new series. Stay tuned! Every week new epised and new interesting shows! How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

Universe: Beyond the Millennium - Creation

"Universe: Beyond the Millennium" is a television series observing astronomical phenomena, research, and theories on the universe and its origins. Narrated by John Hurt. The documentary premiered in 1999 and presents an overview of the universe as humans understood it at that time, and how we think it will evolve in the next millennium. Using 3D computer generated graphics, the series features animated sequences that offer insight into the Big Bang theory and the anatomy of the sun. "Creation", for years scientists have speculated about the beginning of the universe. Some astronomers support the Big Bang theory while others purport the Steady State theory. Which one is correct? Telescopes that tune into natural heat radiation coming from space are helping scientists find answers to these and other questions. One day our universe will cool and die, our only escape maybe to risk a flight into a different universe. Perhaps the greatest question facing the human race is to discover where we came from, and find out what is our ultimate fate. Every culture, every age, has asked that question and tried answering it.

Darkness Visible: Shedding New Light on Black Holes

Black holes may hold the key to understanding the most fundamental truths of the universe, but how do you see something that’s, well, black? Astronomers think they have the answer. Thanks to a global array of radio telescopes that turn the Earth into a giant receiver, we may soon have the first picture of the event horizon of Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. And, with the power of math, scientists are going even further, using equations to “look” inside black holes, peering at the central singularity where general relativity and quantum mechanics collide. Join Brian Greene and other leading physicists and astronomers on a journey to make darkness visible. Find out more about the program and the participants: https://www.worldsciencefestival.com/programs/darkness-visible-shedding-new-light-black-holes/ MODERATOR: Brian Greene PARTICIPANTS: Shep Doeleman, Andrea Ghez, Vicky Kalogera, Cumrun Vafa Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation. Filmed live at the 2018 World Science Festival

How Large is the Universe?

The universe has long captivated us with its immense scales of distance and time. How far does it stretch? Where does it end, and what lies beyond its star fields and streams of galaxies extending as far as telescopes can see? These questions are beginning to yield to a series of extraordinary new lines of investigation and technologies that are letting us to peer into the most distant realms of the cosmos. But also at the behavior of matter and energy on the smallest of scales. Remarkably, our growing understanding of this kingdom of the ultra-tiny, inside the nuclei of atoms, permits us to glimpse the largest vistas of space and time. In ancient times, most observers saw the stars as a sphere surrounding the earth, often the home of deities. The Greeks were the first to see celestial events as phenomena, subject to human investigation rather than the fickle whims of the Gods. One sky-watcher, for example, suggested that meteors are made of materials found on Earth... and might have even come from the Earth. Those early astronomers built the foundations of modern science. But they would be shocked to see the discoveries made by their counterparts today. The stars and planets that once harbored the gods are now seen as infinitesimal parts of a vast scaffolding of matter and energy extending far out into space. Just how far began to emerge in the 1920s. Working at the huge new 100-inch Hooker Telescope on California's Mt. Wilson, astronomer Edwin Hubble, along with his assistant named Milt Humason, analyzed the light of fuzzy patches of sky... known then as nebulae. They showed that these were actually distant galaxies far beyond our own. Hubble and Humason discovered that most of them are moving away from us. The farther out they looked, the faster they were receding. This fact, now known as Hubble's law, suggests that there must have been a time when the matter in all these galaxies was together in one place. That time, when our universe sprung forth, has come to be called the Big Bang. How large the cosmos has gotten since then depends on how long its been growing and its expansion rate. Recent precision measurements gathered by the Hubble space telescope and other instruments have brought a consensus... That the universe dates back 13.7 billion years. Its radius, then, is the distance a beam of light would have traveled in that time ... 13.7 billion light years. That works out to about 1.3 quadrillion kilometers. In fact, it's even bigger.... Much bigger. How it got so large, so fast, was until recently a deep mystery. That the universe could expand had been predicted back in 1917 by Albert Einstein, except that Einstein himself didn't believe it until he saw Hubble and Humason's evidence. Einstein's general theory of relativity suggested that galaxies could be moving apart because space itself is expanding. So when a photon gets blasted out from a distant star, it moves through a cosmic landscape that is getting larger and larger, increasing the distance it must travel to reach us. In 1995, the orbiting telescope named for Edwin Hubble began to take the measure of the universe... by looking for the most distant galaxies it could see. Taking the expansion of the universe into account, the space telescope found galaxies that are now almost 46 billion light years away from us in each direction... and almost 92 billion light years from each other. And that would be the whole universe... according to a straightforward model of the big bang. But remarkably, that might be a mere speck within the universe as a whole, according to a dramatic new theory that describes the origins of the cosmos.

Multiverse: One Universe or Many?

The inflationary theory of cosmology, an enduring theory about our universe and how it was formed, explains that just after the Big Bang, the universe went through a period of rapid expansion. This theory has been critical to understanding what’s going on in the cosmos today. But now, this long-held notion—which seems to suggest as-yet-unproven and perhaps unprovable features such as the multiverse—is under increasing attack. Through informed debate among architects of the inflationary theory and its prime competitors, this program explored our best attempts to understand where we came from. This program is part of the Big Ideas Series The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldscience... Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest Original Program Date: June 1, 2013 MODERATOR: John Hockenberry PARTICIPANTS: Andreas Albrecht, Alan Guth, Andrei Linde, Neil Turok Multiverse: In the Beginning 00:04 John Hockenberry's Introduction 4:33 Participant Introductions 6:35 The Big Bang theory. 8:34 The vacuum of space and the Higgs field. 12:33 What is inflationary theory? 15:40 What does the inflationary model explain? 21:36 What is the experimental evidence of the multiverse? 26:22 What is so exciting about the Planck satellite?31:56 The CMB and what it means to a multiverse. 40:43 What came before the big bang? 46:45 Does string theory help predict there is a multiverse? 53:45 Having no choice is a hard choice to make. 1:00:33 Is the horizon of a black hole is much like the edge of the universe? 1:05:11 Is there a difference between a multiverse and two universes colliding? 1:11:23 Depending on infinity for predictions. 1:16:15

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